Wednesday, August 25, 2010

"The United States of America should have a foundation free from the influence of clergy." - George Washington

I strongly believe in separation of church and state but forces of propaganda are requiring the president to weigh in.
Per the article link below two religious studies professors at the University of Virginia say the president needs to talk more about his religious beliefs, not less.


http://www.pbs.org/wnet/religionandethics/episodes/by-topic/politics/a-n%20ew-religious-narrative.

If President Obama did decide to address the propaganda head on, would he be empowering the propaganda or diffusing it? And if he did speak what should he say?
Well President Obama need look no further than Michael Lockhart from Marysville, Wash. for a cogent, honest, right to the point response. As our guest essayist, Michael provides us with the following fantasy speech:

What President Obama could say:

"If I have not been clear enough this far, I'll say it again: I am a Christian. I love Jesus with all my heart, and I believe that when he said to love your enemy, he meant it. While we may have no choice but to defend ourselves at times, and this is something theologians and leaders have wrestled with for centuries, we must not regard all members of a particular faith as enemies by association. To do so is to directly contradict the teachings of the Bible. Thousands of American Muslims lost loved ones on 911. We must not use their flesh and blood to deny them equal religious rights.

When opponents of the Islamic center invoke the memory of 911 to promote outrage against a Muslim prayer space, they might consider that many of those victims were Muslim themselves. Demanding sensitivity while erasing the identity of one group of Americans does not express the true spirit of America and the Constitution. Respecting the feelings and religious rights of ALL the 911 families does.

As a Christian it is not my place to tell Muslims whether it's a good idea or not to build a mosque at a particular place or time. As President I must uphold the Constitution, both in letter and in spirit. Therefore, it is an easy choice, and one that satisfies both the law and my personal conscience. There is no doubt that Muslims in this country have a legal guarantee of equal religious and property rights, and my oath of office requires me to uphold those rights. To do anything less would be irresponsible and an affront to the principles on which this nation was founded, both legal and spiritual. I ask my fellow Americans to follow both their inner conscience against the irrational emotion of uninformed and angry crowds, and the Constitution which keeps this country free. Thank you, and good night."

Michael Lockhart

The DAVISReport